Page 2 of 2

Re: Ovulation Facts and Factors Affecting Ovualation

PostPosted: 21 Sep 2012, 19:58
by Flora
You could try making some changes in your life so that you feel more relaxed. Eating healthily, exercising and yoga or meditation can all help to reduce stress. Or maybe you need some time away with your partner to help you conceive. If it doesn't help, then it is wise to see your doctor.

Re: Ovulation Facts and Factors Affecting Ovualation

PostPosted: 21 Sep 2012, 20:33
by Pelagie
Hello, my fertility chart was way off last month. I am pretty sure I ovulated on the 30th day of my cycle, instead of the normal 14 days into the cycle. My basal body temperature on day 31 showed a significant rise, and my cervical fluid was egg white too, hence confirming ovulation. Is this normal?

Re: Ovulation Facts and Factors Affecting Ovualation

PostPosted: 21 Sep 2012, 20:41
by Flora
A lot of people assume that women automatically ovulate on day 14 of their cycle. This is not true. Women can ovulate as early as day 6 and as late as day 30 or later. Many factors affect ovulation - hormones, stress, health, etc. So it is very likely that one of mentioned factors affected your normal ovulation.

Re: Ovulation Facts and Factors Affecting Ovualation

PostPosted: 21 Sep 2012, 20:55
by Gina
Is it possible to ovulate twice in the same cycle?

Re: Ovulation Facts and Factors Affecting Ovualation

PostPosted: 21 Sep 2012, 22:17
by Flora
Yes, it is possible to ovulate twice in the same cycle, however it is rare. Occasionally a 2nd egg is released about 24 hours after the 1st egg. The release could probably come from the second ovary.

Re: Ovulation Facts and Factors Affecting Ovualation

PostPosted: 28 Mar 2019, 16:20
by Amelia
Let’s go over a few things about your ovaries and ovulation. A woman has two ovaries that lie between the uterus and the pelvic wall. Inside the ovaries are tiny cysts, called follicles, where your eggs live. On average, you are born with 2 million follicles with eggs in them.  From birth until your death, these follicles will continue to disappear and die. By the time you reach puberty, you will have about 300,000 follicles with eggs inside them left. From this gigantic pool of eggs, a follicle (or sometimes follicles) will be selected each menstrual cycle to be “the chosen one” to ovulate. We do not know how this selection process happens, nor can we influence which egg is chosen.
Ovulation means the egg is released from the follicle in the ovary. Once you ovulate, the egg goes into the fallopian tube where it can be fertilized by a sperm. Usually, only one egg is released, and if fertilized, you have a singleton pregnancy. If 2 eggs are released and fertilized, you end up with fraternal twins. If fertilization does not occur, the uterine lining will break down and come out in the form of menstrual bleeding 14 days after ovulation.