Parenthood

Re: Parenthood

Postby Lis on 19 Sep 2012, 06:14

Hello friends, finding the middle ground between being informed and being scared by sensationalism. Today alot of talk and questions if children should watch TV news? So, in this light, I want every or anyone to share his/her opinions and views about this issue.
Lis
 
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Re: Parenthood

Postby Tony on 19 Sep 2012, 06:18

I also have this question, sitting in the cinema, watching the latest Batman movie, an alarm sounds. Normally it would just be considered an annoyance, but after what happened in Colorado last month, cinema-goers look panicked. A 13-year-old boy asks if he should "hit the ground". His 10-year-old sister has no idea what he is talking about. It is a false alarm, but later the girl asks about his comment. Should she be told about the Colorado shootings or not? It is a question many parents are asking because on one hand they are being told today's kids are wrapped in cotton wool and on the other that they are exposed to too much.
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Re: Parenthood

Postby Nadia on 19 Sep 2012, 06:22

But Rita Princi, psychologist and Australian Council of Children and the Media (ACCM) spokeswoman, is pretty definite in her answer to this question: "Don't tell her. If she doesn't know about the news event, then why does she need to know? Will this information be of any benefit to her? What it will do is make her feel anxious and unsafe.
Nadia
 
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Re: Parenthood

Postby benita_) on 19 Sep 2012, 06:23

As a little child at that age, she sees everything as black and white and may not fully understand the concept of probability to realise this was a random and rare event that happened a long way away."
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Re: Parenthood

Postby Alex31 on 19 Sep 2012, 06:31

The big question of why TV news is scary? Research conducted in the US found 53.8 per cent of stories on TV news broadcasts were about crime, disaster and war. Princi says when kids under 12 see constant information like this they can come to view the world as a mean and scary place and enjoyable activities, such as going to the movies, as dangerous.
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Re: Parenthood

Postby Lis on 19 Sep 2012, 06:33

With older children, they know that 'the news' is supposed to be the real world and are more likely to identify with the persons and situations in the news. For example, they may fear being kidnapped or that their family might suffer a fate seen in the news.
Lis
 
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Re: Parenthood

Postby Alex31 on 19 Sep 2012, 06:37

This is backed by a recent study which found that when violent content viewed by children was described as "news" it produced much higher fear reactions than when it was called "fiction"."Children look to their parents for assurance that they're safe –and they're very astute at picking up on their parents' anxiety," Princi says.
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Re: Parenthood

Postby Nadia on 19 Sep 2012, 06:46

Some research has also shown that some children and adolescents imitate what they see in the news, which can result in "copy cat" events. Meanwhile chronic and persistent exposure to violence can lead to fear, desensitisation and even an increase in violence.
Nadia
 
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Re: Parenthood

Postby Lis on 19 Sep 2012, 06:50

Talking about age appropriateness, organisations for children advises that children should avoid the news, but that can be difficult. Here are some tips for dealing with the news through the ages.
Two to six years: At these ages, kids have a limited ability to discern the fantasy of fiction from the reality of news, so there is no value in them watching scary items about murders, natural disasters and wars.
Lis
 
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Re: Parenthood

Postby Alex31 on 19 Sep 2012, 06:54

Seven to 12 years: This is the most psychologically vulnerable age when it comes to the impact of frightening real-life news because they know the difference between fantasy and reality but lack perspective. "At this age, it's very important you watch the news with them so you can discuss what they see, or turn the TV off if they're disturbed," Princi says
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